Contraction Resources

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32 filtered results
Contractions
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Apostrophes in Contractions 3
Apostrophes in Contractions 3
Exercise
Apostrophes in Contractions 3
Contractions are a staple in casual writing that are used to present a certain mood or tone in a variety of written forms. Give your students the opportunity to practice their skills with these exercises developed specifically for young learners.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
What is Possessive?
What is Possessive?
Worksheet
What is Possessive?
This worksheet explains what is the difference between possessive, plural and contraction words.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Grammar Basics: Compound Words, Contractions, & Abbreviations
Grammar Basics: Compound Words, Contractions, & Abbreviations
Worksheet
Grammar Basics: Compound Words, Contractions, & Abbreviations
Challenge your child to to identify compound words, contractions, and abbreviations in a short story.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Text Message Language
Text Message Language
Worksheet
Text Message Language
Turn text messages full of abbreviated language and lacking punctuation into proper English.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Pairing Up Words
Pairing Up Words
Worksheet
Pairing Up Words
Give your students practice with an important fifth grade language arts skill: Combining words to form contractions and hyphenated compound words.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Word Combos
Word Combos
Worksheet
Word Combos
Give your students practice combining words to create hyphenated compound words and contractions.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Action Contraction
Action Contraction
Song
Action Contraction
When two words are combined into one, and an apostrophe replaces missing letters, a contraction is made! Help kids grasp this concept with this silly song.
2nd grade
Reading & Writing
Song

Contraction Resources

One of the greatest double-edged swords for students is the contraction. While it is a relief to cut letters out of long words with multiple syllables, contractions require extra careful punctuation. The shortest definition of a contraction is that it is a shortened word, syllable, or group of words. In practice, contractions are created by informally removing letters and sounds from words.

Learn More About Contractions

Contractions are mainly used in informal writing and speaking. There are other ways to shorten words, but the most common way to create a contraction is to replace a vowel with an apostrophe. Common examples include:
  • I am → I’m
  • Let us → let’s
  • Not → …n’t
Sometimes, you will need to take out multiple letters, including consonants. Examples you have probably seen or heard before include:
  • I will → I’ll
  • He would/did/had → He’d
And sometimes, you might even have to spell words differently to create a contraction:
  • Will not → won’t
  • Am/is not → ain’t
One word of caution about contractions: you can’t have a contraction without an apostrophe, but don’t confuse a contraction with possession. You may have seen apostrophes used to indicate possession (but never plural), such as Jessica’s. That’s an example of possession, and not a contraction!

Even though apostrophes may intimidate some students, using apostrophes and making contractions is pretty simple.

While there are rules to contractions, there are also exceptions. That means it is worth taking the time to memorize the most common contractions.

Thankfully, Education.com has put together a number of worksheets, and even a clever song or three, to walk your students through the dos and don’ts of contractions. Take advantage of the powerful educational resources here to learn the proper shortcuts to making words shorter.