Conjunction Resources

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Fifth Grade Independent Study Packet - Week 3
Fifth Grade Independent Study Packet - Week 3
Workbook
Fifth Grade Independent Study Packet - Week 3
Week 3 of this independent study packet for fifth graders offers a stack of at-home learning opportunities.
5th grade
Science
Workbook
Grammar Galore
Grammar Galore
Workbook
Grammar Galore
Get your fifth grader clued into advanced grammar. She'll get to edit a few improper sentences, work on different parts of speech, and practice using correct punctuation marks.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Workbook
Parts of Speech
Parts of Speech
Workbook
Parts of Speech
Knowing your parts of speech is an important part of learning good writing skills. Learn the ins and outs of words with this packet that covers the eight different parts of speech.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Workbook
Sentences 2
Sentences 2
Guided Lesson
Sentences 2
Third grade writers will be tasked with writing longer and more complicated sentences. This guided lesson in understanding, constructing and punctuating sentences can support kids as they learn to build bigger and better sentences in their writing. Grammar instruction and practical examples were written by our curriculum experts, complete with a list of recommended building sentence worksheets for third graders.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Guided Lesson
Parts of Speech
Parts of Speech
Guided Lesson
Parts of Speech
Words work together in a sentence, each one performing a different task. By fifth grade, students have become more adept readers and writers and they are familiar with the basic parts of speech. The activities in this unit revisit some of the basics and also add depth to their existing understanding. Students will engage in such topics as superlative adjectives, correlative conjunctions and prepositional phrases, to name a few.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Guided Lesson
Vocabulary Boosters
Vocabulary Boosters
Workbook
Vocabulary Boosters
Squeeze in some extra practice in word analysis, spelling, and punctuation with these engaging grammar worksheets.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Workbook
Writing More Complex Sentences
Writing More Complex Sentences
Lesson Plan
Writing More Complex Sentences
Students will become sentence construction gurus as they learn to craft more sophisticated sentences. Specifically, young writers will use subordinating conjunctions to combine dependent and independent clauses to craft complex sentences.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Conjunctions: FAN BOYS and You
Conjunctions: FAN BOYS and You
Lesson Plan
Conjunctions: FAN BOYS and You
Improve your students' sentence variation with this lesson that teaches them how to use conjunctions to improve the flow of their writing.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions 1
Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions 1
Exercise
Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions 1
Understanding coordinating and subordinating conjunctions is made much easier by this exercise filled with opportunities for practice.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
Functions of Conjunctions
Functions of Conjunctions
Lesson Plan
Functions of Conjunctions
A deeper comprehension of clauses and conjunctions will help your young writers understand the building blocks of language. Practice with conjunctions will also help them create more complex sentences and correct run-on sentences.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Grammar 3
Grammar 3
Guided Lesson
Grammar 3
As students become more sophisticated writers, they begin to understand that words have different “jobs” in a sentence. These jobs can be thought of as parts of speech. In this word study unit, students will learn about the work that transition words, prepositions, verbs, adverbs and adjectives do. Students will also explore how certain kinds of words work together, like verbs and adverbs.
4th grade
Guided Lesson
Grammar Review: Conjunctions
Grammar Review: Conjunctions
Worksheet
Grammar Review: Conjunctions
Get to know your parts of speech! This grammar sheet is full of review activities to help your 5th grader understand conjunctions.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Sentence Cafe
Sentence Cafe
Lesson Plan
Sentence Cafe
It’s time to make sentences! At the Sentence Cafe, words come together to build stories. Get ready to learn about different parts of speech such as conjunctions, possessive pronouns, articles, and more in this hands-on lesson.
1st grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions 2
Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions 2
Exercise
Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions 2
Showing students how to work with coordinating and subordinating conjunctions has never been easier thanks to this exercise.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
Prepositions vs. Conjunctions
Prepositions vs. Conjunctions
Lesson Plan
Prepositions vs. Conjunctions
Challenge students with a discussion about prepositions and conjunctions in this lesson. Your class will write a journal entry to explain the function of the prepositions and conjunctions in a specific sentence.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Correlative Conjunctions
Correlative Conjunctions
Exercise
Correlative Conjunctions
Help students expand their knowledge of sentence structures with these exercises that encourage students to use correlative conjunctions in their writing.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
Scary Story Elements
Scary Story Elements
Lesson Plan
Scary Story Elements
In this lesson, students will use conjunctions to compare and contrast scary stories. It can be taught independently or used as a pre-lesson to Using Story Elements to Compare and Contrast Fiction Texts.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Parts of Speech Word Hunt
Parts of Speech Word Hunt
Worksheet
Parts of Speech Word Hunt
Students will search for verbs, conjunctions, adjectives, articles, possessive pronouns, and nouns. Then, they will categorize that word by coloring it a certain color. Just read, think, and color!
Kindergarten
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Conjunctions 2
Conjunctions 2
Exercise
Conjunctions 2
Conjunctions are important for linking two ideas in a cohesive and fluid way. Give your fourth grader the skills they need to correctly use conjunctions with these exercises.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
Conjunction Examples for Kids
Conjunction Examples for Kids
Worksheet
Conjunction Examples for Kids
This worksheet offers conjunction examples for kids with sentences to finish using a conjunctions word bank.
Kindergarten
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Conjunctions: The Cure for Your Run-ons
Conjunctions: The Cure for Your Run-ons
Worksheet
Conjunctions: The Cure for Your Run-ons
Writers will learn to identify run-on sentences and repair them with conjunctions.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Sentence Scramble
Sentence Scramble
Lesson Plan
Sentence Scramble
Young writers will learn to manipulate and combine sentences with conjunctions and adverb phrases. This skill helps students understand that crafting sentences is a creative and artistic process.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Conjunctions 1
Conjunctions 1
Exercise
Conjunctions 1
Teach your third grader how to write two-thought sentences with these exercises that use conjunctions to merge shorter sentences into one.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
The Missing Link
The Missing Link
Lesson Plan
The Missing Link
Help your students fill in the missing links! With a focus on transitional words and conjunctions, your students will discover the links that will help them combine ideas in their writing.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
Two Perspectives
Two Perspectives
Lesson Plan
Two Perspectives
Use this lesson to help your ELs understand how to use conjunctions when contrasting information from two different characters’ perspectives. It can be a stand-alone lesson or used as support to the Whose Point Is It Anyway? lesson.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan

Conjunction Resources

Conjunctions are short words that connect phrases, clauses or sentences together so we don’t speak or write in choppy sentences. We’ve all been told as kids, “No ifs, ands or buts!” Turns out, these are all conjunctions that help us form more elegant sentences. With our worksheets and resources, let’s meet at the conjunction junction and break down this most important part of speech.

Learn More About Conjunctions

If nouns, verbs and adjectives do the heavy lifting in a sentence, conjunctions serve as the bridge that link our thoughts together, allowing us to form more complex sentences. Consider this sentence: “I like to cook and eat delicious meals, but I don’t like to clean up the kitchen afterwards.” Without the use of the conjunctions “and” and “but,” we would have to say three short sentences: “I like to cook.” “I like to eat delicious meals.” “I don’t like to clean up the kitchen afterwards.” Conjunctions help our thoughts flow more seamlessly.

Three Types of Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions
: Coordinating conjunctions join words, phrases and clauses of equal grammatical rank in a sentence.
Examples: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so. (There are seven coordinating conjunctions and can be memorized by the mnemonic device “FANBOYS.”)
“I love pizza and hamburgers, but I hate hot dogs.”

Correlative Conjunctions: Correlative conjunctions are pairs of conjunctions that work together. They are always used in together and denote equality.
Examples: either/or, neither/nor, not only/but also
“Not only did she win the competition, but she also set a new record.”

Subordinating Conjunctions: Subordinating conjunctions link a dependent clause to an independent clause. They signal a cause-and-effect relationship, a contrast or some other kind of relationship between the clauses.
Examples: Because, since, as, although, though, while, whereas
“He failed the exam because he didn’t study hard enough.”

While conjunctions are often found in the middle of the sentence, you can start sentences with them. A subordinating conjunction can begin a sentence if the dependent clause comes before the independent clause: “Because I didn’t get enough sleep, I fell asleep in class.” You can also begin a sentence with a coordinating conjunction to add emphasis: “Go to bed! And don’t forget to brush your teeth.”