Alliteration Resources

34 filtered results
34 filtered results
Alliteration
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Finish the Alliteration
Finish the Alliteration
Worksheet
Finish the Alliteration
Help your students practice identifying and writing alliterative sentences
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Look for the Sounds
Look for the Sounds
Worksheet
Look for the Sounds
Give your students practice with onomatopoeia identification and various contexts of the associated sounds. This worksheet will help your fourth and fifth graders recognize onomatopoeia words and how they enhance the meaning of the text.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
More Creative Alliteration
More Creative Alliteration
Worksheet
More Creative Alliteration
Challenge your students to write sentences using alliteration!
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Writing with Alliteration
Writing with Alliteration
Worksheet
Writing with Alliteration
This worksheet provides great practice for students to use alliteration in their writing.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Creative Alliteration
Creative Alliteration
Worksheet
Creative Alliteration
Students will use their imaginations to write sentences using alliteration.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Glossary: Making Alliteration Accessible
Glossary: Making Alliteration Accessible
Worksheet
Glossary: Making Alliteration Accessible
Use this glossary with the EL Support Lesson: Making Alliteration Accessible.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Make It Alliterate #2
Make It Alliterate #2
Worksheet
Make It Alliterate #2
This wonderful worksheet is a great way for students to practice using alliteration!
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Vocabulary Cards: Making Alliteration Accessible
Vocabulary Cards: Making Alliteration Accessible
Worksheet
Vocabulary Cards: Making Alliteration Accessible
Use these vocabulary cards with the EL Support Lesson: Making Alliteration Accessible.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Write Santa Claus-Themed Alliteration
Write Santa Claus-Themed Alliteration
Activity
Write Santa Claus-Themed Alliteration
Give your third grader a head start in language arts by teaching her an alliteration lesson with this Santa Claus-themed writing project.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Activity

Alliteration Resources

Alliteration—words in a row or are close together that have the same first consonant sound—is a figure of speech that’s fun for kids to learn. They are commonly found in tongue-twisters or poems, but they occur in daily speech as well. With our worksheets and games, teach your student all about this literary stylistic device that will jazz up their writing.

Alliteration 101

If you’ve every played tongue twisters with your youngster, then they are familiar with alliteration. “She sells seashells by the seashore” and “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers” are probably some of the earliest examples they’ve ever heard.

In addition to tongue twisters, alliteration is common in poems and song lyrics. Alliteration works well in this format because the rhyming lends musicality in the words, making poems or songs easier to memorize. They also give flow and beauty to a piece of writing, something that your student will learn for themselves once they start using this device.

The best way to spot alliteration is to sound out the sentence. That way, your student can hear the identical consonant sounds. Invent alliterative sentence that they can try out, or have them write one themselves.

Examples:
Alice ate an awful lot of apples in August.
Eric eats eggs every evening.
We ate watermelon while waiting for William.

It is important to remember that alliteration does not depend on letters but on sounds, so the sentence “Gina is gorgeous” is not alliterative, while “Glinda is gorgeous” is.

In teaching your students alliteration, point out examples of it in daily life.

Companies use alliteration to create brands that stick in the minds of consumers.
  • Dunkin’ Donuts
  • PayPal
  • Best Buy
  • Coca-Cola
  • Chuck E. Cheese’s
  • Bed Bath & Beyond
  • Krispy Kreme
People real and fictional stand out more when they have alliterative names. Writers love to use them to create memorable characters.
  • Ronald Reagan
  • Sammy Sosa
  • Jesse Jackson
  • Marilyn Monroe
  • Spongebob Squarepants
  • Mickey Mouse
  • Donald Duck