December 23, 2017
|
By Sarah Zegarra

Lesson plan

Wacky Paragraphs with Prepositional Phrases!

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GradeSubjectView aligned standards

Students will be able to identify and form prepositional phrases in their writing.

(5 minutes)
  • Gather students and show them two versions of a paragraph they are currently reading in class:
    • One version with the prepositional phrases left out.
    • Another version unedited, as is.
  • Ask students to compare the two paragraphs and share their thoughts with a partner regarding the differences.
  • Have a few students share their thinking with the class.
  • Explain to students that, in one paragraph, the prepositional phrases were deleted.
  • Underline the prepositional phrases in each sentence, and point them out explicitly to your class.
  • Tell your students that today they will discover the importance of prepositional phrases in their writing and that of their peers.
(10 minutes)
  • Remind students that PrepositionsAre parts of speech that express the relationship between a noun, pronoun, and other words in the sentence. They are often used to demonstrate time, location, or direction.
  • Brainstorm with your class as many prepositions as possible, and write these on chart paper for all to see.
  • Take care to note the most common prepositions: with, in, on, at, over, through, before, after, since, during, from, of, beside, inside, under, and across.
  • Show The Prepositions Song video.
  • Remind your students that Prepositional phrasesAlways begin with a preposition and end with a noun or pronoun. They often tell us the where and the which of a sentence (e.g. The girl with pitch black hair ran into the store. Which girl? The girl with the pitch black hair. Where did she run? Into the store.)
(15 minutes)
  • Ask students to take out their writing journals or samples and ask for a volunteer to share a piece of writing.
  • Model how to underline the prepositional phrases with a colored pencil to help students realise how essential they are in writing and how much they naturally use them in their stories.
  • Have students work with a partner to go hunting for prepositional phrases in each others' writing.
  • From their own writing or their partner's, have students jot down three of their favorite prepositional phrases on a sticky note and add 2–3 more prepositional phrases to their list.
  • Show students how to create a wacky paragraph using some of the phrases on the sticky notes, such as up the tree, under the stars, during the night, with a big smile, and inside a cave.
    • Example: There once was a bear who lived inside a cave. She woke up one morning with a big smile and plenty of energy, so she decided to climb up the tree to have her breakfast. She stayed there all day. Later on, she met a lemur during the night and they ended up becoming friends under the stars.
  • If needed, add a quick sketch to the paragraph.
(15 minutes)
  • Collect the sticky notes and redistribute them to the students. Make sure no one gets their own list.
  • Ask students to independently write their own wacky paragraph using the prepositional phrases on the sticky note.
  • Encourage students to add an illustration to their paragraph if time permits. Walk around the room to support students with guiding questions and posted lesson resources.

Support:

  • Demonstrate the concept of prepositions using a concrete objects, such as a stuffed animal and a box, while sharing statements like, "The stuffie is beside the box. The stuffie is in the box."

Enrichment:

  • Encourage students who finish early to find and add more prepositional phrases to their list from their independent reading and share them with a partner. Check to make sure they are indeed prepositional phrases.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students turn in their wacky paragraphs.
  • Check both the sticky notes and their paragraphs to assess for ability to form a prepositional phrase and use it correctly.
(5 minutes)
  • Ask for a few student volunteers to read their paragraphs aloud to the class. Ask the students who are listening to name the prepositional phrases they hear in the paragraph.
  • Remind your class that prepositional phrases are important in writing because:
    • They are parts of speech that express the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in the sentence.
    • Their form is often used to demonstrate time, location or direction.
    • Prepositional phrases add detail and further enrich their writing.

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