August 28, 2018
|
By Mia Perez

Lesson plan

Using Story Elements to Compare and Contrast Fiction Texts

No ratings yet
Download lesson plan
Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Scary Story ElementsPre-lesson.
EL Adjustments
GradeSubjectView aligned standards

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

Which set of standards are you looking for?

Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Scary Story ElementsPre-lesson.

Students will be able to compare and contrast the story elements between two fictional texts.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that today they will look at fictional texts, which are texts about imagined characters and events.
  • Explain to students that fictional texts contain important elements called Story elementsThat enable the story to run smoothly and allow the action to develop in a logical way that the reader can follow.
  • Inform students that these story elements include characters, setting, plot, conflict, resolution, and theme.
  • Tell students that today they will be comparing and contrasting the story elements of two fictional texts.
  • Explain to students that to CompareMeans to look for elements that are similar and to ContrastMeans to look for elements that are different.
(10 minutes)
  • Post a piece of chart paper on the board with the story elements listed.
  • Call on volunteers to define each of the story elements and provide support as needed.
    • CharacterIs a person, or sometimes an animal, who takes part in the action of the story and who the story is about.
    • SettingIs where and when the story takes place.
    • PlotIs a series of events and character actions that relate to the main conflict.
    • ConflictIs a struggle between two opposing forces.
    • ResolutionIs the solution to the problem.
    • ThemeIs the central idea in a story.
  • Write each definition on the chart paper.
  • Tell students that they will compare and contrast these story elements from two different fictional texts.
(15 minutes)
  • Project the Compare Story Elements worksheet onto the board.
  • Tell students that we will complete a portion of this table as a class.
  • Call on classroom volunteers to suggest two stories to compare and contrast. (Tip: encourage students to select stories that you have read previously in the classroom so that everyone is familiar with the story elements from the two stories.)
  • Write the names of the two stories at the top of the paper.
  • Read aloud the text in the shaded box in each row so that students have a clear understanding of what type of information they should incorporate into this table.
  • Divide students into small groups and distribute the Compare Story Elements worksheet to each student.
  • Tell students to complete the first two rows of the table in their small groups.
  • Circulate around the groups and provide support as needed.
  • Come together as a group to discuss students' answers and fill in the projected worksheet with their findings.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students they will complete the remainder of the table independently.
  • Circulate and offer support as needed.

Support:

  • Pre-teach an introductory lesson on story elements for students needing more practise with this concept.
  • Allow students needing extra support to continue working in a small group during Independent Work Time.
  • Enable students to focus on one or two of the story elements instead of completing the entire table.
  • Provide students with glossaries or dictionaries.

Enrichment:

  • Challenge students to add a third column to their table so that they will compare and contrast story elements from three different fictional texts.
  • Provide students with lined paper or writing journals and have them compare and contrast story elements in an essay format as opposed to a table.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the Compare Story Elements worksheet that was used during the Guided practise/Modeling section back onto the board.
  • Draw another column so that there is room to add a third story to compare and contrast with the two stories that the students worked on earlier in the lesson. (Tip: select a third story that you have read previously in the classroom so that everyone is familiar with the story elements from that story.)
  • Call on volunteers to fill in each row for the third story.
  • Ask for students to give a thumbs up if they agree with their classmates' contributions or a thumbs down if they disagree.
  • Monitor students' responses to gauge understanding.
(5 minutes)
  • Explain to students that being able to determine similarities and differences in stories can help improve reading skills and comprehension.
  • Remind students that today they compared and contrasted the story elements from fictional stories.
  • Ask students to brainstorm a list of other things that you can compare and contrast in fictional texts (i.e., narrator/point of view, author's style, genre, etc.).

Add to collection

Create new collection

Create new collection

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely

What could we do to improve Education.com?

Please note: Use the Contact Us link at the bottom of our website for account-specific questions or issues.

What would make you love Education.com?

What is your favorite part about Education.com?