Lesson plan

Mindful Eating: Remembering Our Interconnections

In this lesson, students will discuss "interconnections," practise mindful eating and gratitude for the food we eat, and put together poems that illustrate interconnections and gratitude.
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Students will be able to define "interconnections," reflect on our reliance on nature and each other, and practise mindful eating.

(10 minutes)
  • Join students together in a circle, either seated or standing.
  • Write the word "interconnections" on the board.
  • Ask students, two to three at a time, to come up silently and write words, questions, or statements connected to the word.
  • Explain that they may also circle or underline parts of the word, as well.
  • Ask, "What are we connected to? Who and what do we rely on to live and survive?"
  • Ask, "How can we remember these things each day?"
(15 minutes)
  • Explain that today they will practise mindful eating and remembering our interconnections to the food we eat.
  • Explain that each student will receive one raisin, but they are to hold it in their hand until directions are given.
  • Pass out one raisin for each student.
  • Play the video "Kids Meditation: Thank the Farmer."
  • Ask students to bring up gratitude again for the energy and connections that brought the raisin to them.
  • Invite them to take a few breaths and quietly notice the colors, lighting, and shadows on their raisin.
  • Ask them to place the raisin in their mouth, but not to chew yet.
  • Guide them to notice the sensations and textures in their mouth.
  • Guide students to slowly chew their raisin, taking 30 seconds to chew.
  • Guide them to notice how it feels as they swallow.
  • Invite them to notice if they can feel the raisin land in the stomach.
  • Ask, "What did you notice? How do you feel?"
(5 minutes)
  • Ask, "How can we remember the interconnections we have with the food we eat? And how we rely on nature and each other?"
  • Play the TedxSF video "Gratitude."
  • Ask students to share out with the class what stood out for them in the video.
  • Explain that they will be writing a poem that they may read before they eat to remind others of our interconnections with nature and the food we eat.
  • Share some of your favorite poems for inspiration. Discuss what specific words are inspiring in these poems, and why they may have been chosen by the poet.
  • Review the Interconnections Poem worksheet with the class.
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
(20 minutes)
  • Dismiss students back to their seats to work independently on their poem. Circle around the room and connect with as many students as possible to check for understanding, answer questions and provide support as needed.

Enrichment: Ask advanced students to paint or draw a picture that depicts interconnections to hang up in class or in the cafeteria.

Support: Work one-on-one or in small groups with some students during independent work time that need extra support.

(5 minutes)
  • Walk around the room and check student comprehension of interconnection during work time.
(5 minutes)
  • Bring students back together in a circle.
  • Ask students to read their poem for the class.
  • Ask students to facilitate "P-Q-S" after each poem (in which P stands for praise, Q for questions, and S for suggestions). Share that we engage in P-Q-S to support our active listening and build our connection with classmates around what we are learning.
  • After each poem, have a student volunteer offer a P-Q-S. To ensure equitable participation, pull names out of a hat so each student facilitates P-Q-S once.
  • Ask, "Where could we display our poems to remind others of our interconnections? "
  • Explain that their poems will be up in the cafeteria as a reminder to remember where our food comes from and our interconnections.

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