Lesson plan

Malala: Speaking Out for Girls' Rights

In this lesson plan, students learn about Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist who advocated for a girls' rights to an education.
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In this lesson plan, Malala: Speaking Out for Girls' Rights, students will learn about Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist who advocated for a girls' rights to an education. First, the class will read part of the memoir Malala: My Story of Standing up for Girls' Rights.Then, after a discussion about the vocabulary term "rights," students will pick one right they would stand up for. Students will then write an opinion paragraph and create a poster about the right they feel strongly about.

  • Students will be able to read an informational text.
  • Students will be able to write about their opinions.
(15 minutes)
  • Share that Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani activist. When she was 11, the Taliban took control of her town and ordered girls not to go to school. Malala began speaking up for a woman’s right to get an education, even though it was dangerous to do so. In 2012, when she was 16, Malala was shot. Luckily, she made a full recovery and continues to advocate for women’s rights. Malala was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, making her the youngest person to become a Nobel Laureate.
  • Read the book Malala: My Story of Standing up for Girls' Rights. This book is a bit lengthy, so feel free to read a portion now and a portion at the end of the lesson or at another time throughout your day.
  • Ask students to share what they learned about Malala. Write down students' ideas on a piece of chart paper.
(5 minutes)
  • Explain that Malala stood up for girls' right for an education. Share that RightsDescribe a standard of life that everyone should be guaranteed. For example, human rights include the right to work, the right to an education, freedom of thought, freedom from slavery, and so on.
  • Tell students that they will be considering one right that they would like to stand up for.
(5 minutes)
  • Introduce the Stand up Like Malala worksheet and model how to complete it.
  • Show students how they will be creating posters after filling out their worksheets.
(15 minutes)
  • Hand out a copy of the Stand up Like Malala worksheet to each student. Have students work independently to complete the worksheets.
  • As students work, circulate around the room to provide assistance with reading and/or answering the questions.
  • Guide students to create a poster that represents the right that they wrote about.

Enrichment:

  • Challenge students to do more research about Malala. Assist students in finding websites and books that can help them answer the questions.
  • Have students brainstorm where they could share or hang their posters, then take action to do so.

Support:

  • Have students work in a small, teacher-led group during Independent Work Time.
  • Have students work with a partner to complete the worksheet and design the poster.
  • Collect student worksheets and posters to assess them for understanding.
(5 minutes)
  • Bring the students back together as a whole group.
  • Hang up students' posters. Have them participate in a notice and wonder thinking routine. Ask students to share what they notice and what they wonder about the posters.

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