November 29, 2017
|
By Catherine Crider

Lesson plan

Lucky Coin Match-Up

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Students will be able to write and match upper and lowercase letters.

(5 minutes)
  • Call students together.
  • Show students one of the red envelopes. Ask students what they think is inside.
  • After every student has had the opportunity to guess, have a student volunteer open the envelope and show the money that’s inside.
  • Ask students to think about times when they have received money in the past. If they do not mention the holidays, guide students towards this.
  • Explain to students that giving “lucky money” in red envelopes is a Chinese New Year tradition.
(5 minutes)
  • Explain to students that today they will have the opportunity to make their own lucky money, but it will look a little different. They will be able to use their money to play a game.
  • Show students how to trace a quarter on a piece of paper and cut the circle out. Repeat this process so that two circles are cut out.
  • Then, show students how to write an uppercase "A" on one paper coin and a lowercase “a” on the other paper coin. Explain to students that they will be doing this for every letter of the alphabet so that they have a complete set of lucky alphabet coins. These will be used in a matching game where students will try to correctly match upper and lowercase letters.
(5 minutes)
  • Pass out pieces of colored paper and a quarter to every student.
  • Pick a student to demonstrate again for the group how to trace a quarter on a piece of paper and cut the circle out. Have another student volunteer also show this to the group, so that two circles are cut out.
  • Then, have student volunteers demonstrate how to write an uppercase “B” on one paper coin and a lowercase “b” on the other paper coin.
  • Remind students that they will be doing this for every letter of the alphabet, resulting in a complete set of lucky alphabet coins. (Tip: As a time saving tactic, giving students some precut circles can help to reduce the amount of cutting needed. This can also be used as a way to scaffold the activity for some students.)
  • Explain to students that they will be working as partners to make a complete alphabet set, so they can play a matching game together. Demonstrate the game using the A-a and B-b coins the class made: flip these over so that the letter is not visible, choose two, and see if they are a match. Ask if students have any questions about this.
  • Discuss as a group any expectations for quiet work times before sending students off to work.
(30 minutes)
  • Any adults in the room should be circulating, answering questions, and observing student knowledge as students are working.
  • For a festive feel, consider playing some soft, festive Chinese New Year music in the background.
  • Setting up a variety of different seating areas can encourage students to spread out and not disrupt other groups.

Support:Tracing letters instead of writing letters from scratch can help to scaffold this activity. The presence of alphabet charts can assist students with both writing and matching letters. For students who need a little extra help, working with a partner who has more alphabet knowledge can also help to scaffold the activity.

Enrichment:For students looking for a greater challenge, try including pictures instead of one set of letters. Have students match each picture to the letter that object begins or ends with.

(5 minutes)
  • Success at playing the matching game can be used to assess whether or not students are able to match upper and lowercase letters.
  • Observation of students' letter formation on the coins can be used to determine whether or not students are able to write upper and lowercase letters.
(5 minutes)
  • Call students back together.
  • Ask students if there were any letters they had trouble matching. Were any letters harder to remember than others?
  • Remind students that lucky money is a Chinese New Year tradition.
  • Encourage students to take their coins home to play some more. Leave a set of coins out in the classroom for students to practise matching when they have free time.

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