July 11, 2019
|
By Meena Srinivasan

Lesson plan

Just the Facts, Please!

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GradeSubject

Students will be able to define "fact" and "opinion" and evaluate statements to decide if they are facts or opinions.

(10 minutes)
  • Join students together in a circle, either seated in chairs or on the floor.
  • To begin, write the following two phrases on the board and say them out loud:
    • "It is sunny out."
    • "I love when the sun is shining."
  • Ask the class to share what they think the difference is between each phrase. Build on students' answers, and share that one statement is an opinion (I love when the sun is shining) and one is a fact (It is sunny out).
  • Write the words "opinion" and "fact" on the board (under the corresponding statements).
  • Ask the class, "What is an opinion?" Then, write the following definition on the board: "A judgement about something, not based on fact."
  • Ask the class, "What is a fact?" Then, write the following definition: "A thing that can be proven to be true."
  • Ask the class, "Can we prove that the sun is shining?" Explain that since we can prove that the sun is shining, this statement is a Fact.
  • Now ask, "Can we prove that I love sunshine?" Explain that since we cannot prove that I love sunshine, this statement is an Opinion.
  • Ask students for more examples of facts, and write them on the board (e.g. my dog is brown).
  • Then, ask students to give you examples of opinions, and write them on the board (e.g. I like to pet my dog).
(5 minutes)
  • Place students in pairs. Have each pair decide who is partner A and who is a partner B.
  • Write the following statement on the board: "The best colour is red."
  • Ask how many students agree with this statement. Then, discuss how this statement is an opinion, not a fact.
  • Show students a red marker, and write on the board: "This marker is red."
  • Ask for a student volunteer. Together, demonstrate for the class how they may share with their partner if they think the statement is a fact or opinion, and why.
(5 minutes)
  • Write another fact or opinion statement on the board, and ask partner A in each pair to first share with their partners if they think the statement is a fact or opinion, and why. Give them 1–2 minutes to explain their answers.
  • Regroup and ask the class if someone could share if the statement is a fact or opinion, and explain why.
  • Give the students the right answer, and explain why it's correct.
  • Write a new fact or opinion statement on the board, and ask partner B in each pair to share with their partners if they think the statement is a fact or opinion, and why. Give them 1–2 minutes to explain their answers.
  • Regroup and ask the class if someone could share if the statement is a fact or opinion, and explain why.
  • Give the students the right answer, and share why it's correct.
  • Repeat this process a few more times for students to get more practise differentiating between facts and opinions.
(25 minutes)
  • Explain to students that they will be working independently on a worksheet at their seats. Their job is to draw a picture of both a fact and an opinion.
  • Show the class your completed Draw It: Facts and Opinions worksheet.
  • Ask students if they have any questions.
  • Dismiss the class back to their seats to complete the worksheet.

Enrichment:Ask students to create a poster, using both words and drawings, that illustrates the difference between a fact and opinion.

Support:Check in one-on-one with students who have difficulty during the pair-share activity. Offer more examples of facts and opnions, and ask them to try to come up with some of their own.

(5 minutes)
  • Observe students and ask questions during the pair-share activity to assess their understanding of facts and opinions.
  • Observe students during the independent working time.
  • Collect worksheets to check for students' understanding of the definitions of facts and opinions.
(5 minutes)
  • After the independent working time, have students place their worksheets around the room for a gallery walk with different examples of facts and opinions.
  • Ask the class to quietly walk around the room and pay attention to what they notice in each picture.
  • After the gallery walk, ask the class to come back into a circle and to share what they noticed about their classmates' work.
  • Ask the class, "Why do you think it's helpful to know the difference between facts and opinions. How can this help us get along with others?"
  • Tell the students that their work will be displayed in the room.

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