August 28, 2018
|
By Mia Perez

Lesson plan

Inference Detectives

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Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Steps to Make an InferencePre-lesson.
EL Adjustments
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Steps to Make an InferencePre-lesson.

Students will be able to make inferences from nonfiction texts using their background knowledge and evidence from the text.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(5 minutes)
  • Project the Making Inferences worksheet onto the board and cover everything except the first passage about the sun.
  • Read the passage aloud.
  • Uncover the first question and ask for a volunteer to answer it.
  • Ask the volunteer to explain how they came up with their answer.
  • Continue this process until all four questions have been answered.
  • Tell students that they just practiced making inferences.
(10 minutes)
  • Tell students that an InferenceIs an educated guess. It is a conclusion you come to based on your background knowledge, reasoning, and evidence from a text.
  • Project the second passage in the Making Inferences worksheet and read the passage aloud.
  • Model how to complete the first question by using clues from the text and reasoning to make an inference.
  • Call on volunteers to answer the remaining questions on the worksheet. Remind students to explain how they came up with their answers and made their inferences.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students that they will now practise making inferences using nonfiction texts. Emphasize that they will reference the specific details and examples (i.e., the evidence) in the text they used to make their inferences.
  • Project the Making Inferences: Courageous Leaders Part 1 worksheet on the board.
  • Call on student volunteers to define the bolded vocabulary words prior to reading the passage. (Tip: encourage students to define the vocabulary words using their background knowledge, and model how to look up words in a dictionary if necessary).
  • Read the passage aloud.
  • Turn to the second page of the worksheet and read the instructions aloud.
  • Complete this activity as a class by calling on student volunteers.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students that they will now practise this skill independently.
  • Preview and distribute the Making Inferences: Courageous Leaders Part 2 worksheet.
  • Provide students with dictionaries if necessary.
  • Circulate and offer support as needed.

Support:

  • Pre-teach a lesson that models making inferences from pictures.
  • Allow students to practise making inferences using less challenging texts during Independent Work Time by using the Can You Make an Inference? worksheet (see optional materials).
  • Provide tailored assistance in a small group.

Enrichment:

  • Encourage students to practise making inferences using a more challenging text during Independent Work Time by using the Steph Curry: Superstar worksheet (see optional materials).
  • Challenge students to create inferences through a writing activity. For example:
    • Write about a windy morning without saying that it is windy.
    • Write about a character who is very shy without saying that they are shy.
    • Write about a place that is very old without saying that it is old.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students volunteer to pick a sentence strip and read the sentences aloud (e.g., "My palms are sweaty and my stomach feels funny," "I hear lots of screaming and my hair goes crazy when I go upside down," and "This is so scary but so fun!").
  • Tell the volunteer to call on a classmate to infer what the person is doing and/or where they are based on the sentence strip description (e.g., riding a rollercoaster).
  • Ask students to agree or disagree with their classmate’s answer by showing a thumbs up or a thumbs down.
  • Repeat this activity until all of the sentence strips have been read.
  • Monitor students' responses to gauge understanding.
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that today they practiced making inferences using nonfiction texts.
  • Explain to students that this is a valuable comprehension skill that they will use in other classes, such as maths, science, and social studies.
  • Tell students that they even make inferences in their everyday lives and in social situations.
  • Call on students to share examples of inferences that they have made outside of reading class.

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