February 18, 2019
|
By Kerry McKee

EL Support Lesson

Very Hungry Addition

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Maths With BearsLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Maths With BearsLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to count on to add within 20.

Language

Students will be able to describe the steps to add within 20 using a number line and partner support.

(2 minutes)
  • Show students the cover of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, and ask students to give you a thumbs up if they are familiar with the book.
  • Introduce the story by saying, "The Very Hungry CaterpillarTells the story of a caterpillar who eats more and more each day of the week. We will read the story today, and add to find the total number of things that the caterpillar eats."
  • Review the days of the week with students. For example, have them repeat after you, "Today is ____. Tomorrow will be ____. Yesterday was ____."
(13 minutes)
  • Read the story, pausing after the caterpillar eats the apple on Monday. Display the sentence frame, "The caterpillar ate ____On ____."
  • Review the irregular past tense verb, "ate." Have students gesture as though they are eating something, and repeat after you, "Today I Eat.Yesterday I Ate."
  • Choose a student volunteer to share a sentence, "The caterpillar ate one apple on Monday." Write "1 apple" on the board.
  • Continue with Tuesday. Tell students to turn and talk to a partner about what the caterpillar ate on Tuesday, using the sentence frame. Write "2 pears" on the board.
  • Repeat with Wednesday through Friday, writing "3 plums," "4 strawberries" and "5 oranges" on the board.
  • Tell students that you want to know the total number of pieces of fruit the caterpillar ate during the week. Ask students to turn and talk to a partner about how you could figure out the total number.
  • Choose students to share strategies. Suggestions might include counting on, using the number line, or drawing a picture of the problem.
  • Explain that we will need to use AdditionSince we are solving for the total number. We want to find out the Sum, or total number, of pieces of fruit that the catepillar ate.
  • Model solving the problem using the number line. Begin at one, and hop forward two times to three. Hop to six, 10, and 15 for each day that the caterpillar ate more fruit.
  • Tell the class to repeat after you, "The caterpillar ate 15 pieces of fruit."
  • Continue with Saturday. Count the number of things that the caterpillar ate on Saturday chorally as a class (10).
  • Briefly review strategies for finding 10 more than a number. Ask the class, "How many things has the caterpillar eaten so far?" Tell students to repeat after you, "The caterpillar ate 25 things."
  • Continue with Sunday. Add one more to your total to account for the leaf. Tell students to turn and talk to a partner and share the total number of things the caterpillar ate in the story (26).
  • Finish the story.
(10 minutes)
  • Write an addition problem on the board, and model solving an addition problem using a number line. For example, 7 + 4.Be sure to show examples of addition problems written horizontally as well as vertically.
  • Ask students where you should start on the number line (seven).
  • Tell students to turn and talk to a partner about whether you will move forward or backward on the number line, and why.
  • Discuss that since you are adding, you will move forward on the number line. The total of the two numbers will be bigger than the parts.
  • Model jumping forward four times on the number line. Emphasize that you will not count the number that you start on. You will immediately jump to the next number to add one more.
  • Draw arrows from one number to the next as you count four jumps. Ask students to call out the solution to the problem (11).
  • Distribute Number Lines 1-20 to students. Write an addition problem on the board, and prompt students to describe the steps to solve each problem using the number line.
  • Repeat with more examples until students are able to use the number line to solve addition problems.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute the Addition to 20 Check-in worksheet.
  • Prompt students to work with a partner to solve the problems using their number lines.
  • Even if students have the facts memorized, instruct them to check their answers using the number line.

Beginning

  • If students do not know number names in English, allow them to count using their home language (L1).
  • Review the concept of addition using manipulatives and real-world context.

Advanced

  • Instruct students to explain the steps to add using a number line by imagining that they must explain how it works to a kindergartner.
  • Ask students to describe other strategies for adding, such as drawing a picture or using a ten frame.
(3 minutes)
  • Rotate in the classroom as students complete the worksheet and take notes about student understanding of using a number line to add. Observe whether students are able to count on accurately using the number line.
  • Prompt students to explain their thinking as you circulate. Ask students questions such as "What steps do you need to follow to add using the number line?", "What is the next step?", and "How did you solve the problem?"
(2 minutes)
  • Tell students to give you a thumbs up if using a number line helped them to solve the problems.
  • Choose a few volunteers to share ways in which using a number line to count is helpful.

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