EL Support Lesson

Things We Love: Counting to 100

In this fun literature and art infused lesson plan, students will learn how to use a hundreds chart when extending the number sequence to 100! Can be used as a stand alone or support lesson plan for the **Number Jump** lesson.
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for theNumber Jump!Lesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for theNumber Jump!Lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to count to 100 by ones.

Language

Students will be able to explain strategies for counting to 100.

(2 minutes)
Missing Numbers: At the PondMissing Numbers: Counting BeeVocabulary Cards: Counting to 100Glossary: Counting to 100Write Student-Facing Language Objectives ReferenceTeach Background Knowledge Template
  • Gather students together for a read aloud.
  • Display the book 100 Things That Make Me HappyAnd introduce the title, author, and illustrator.
  • Ask students to think-pair-share if 100 is a big amount or small amount.
  • Tell the class that today they will be counting to 100!
(5 minutes)
  • Read aloud the text, counting aloud throughout and relating the sequence to the hundreds chart displayed in the classroom.
  • Use the Vocabulary Cards to define or introduce key words for today's lesson. Point to the hundreds chart and say, "This is a counting aid. An aid is something that helps you do something."
  • Have the class echo count after you while you point to each number on the hundreds chart.
  • Model how you are counting in OrderAnd explain to the class that when you count 1-100, you want to keep track and count in order from the smallest number (1) to the biggest number (100).
  • Explain that learning to count to 100 is like being a detective looking for PatternsOr things that repeat. Tell students learning their numbers in order from 1-20 will actually allow them to count to 100. Model this by showing how numbers repeat on the chart.
(5 minutes)
  • Instruct the students to practise counting to 100 by counting aloud with you as you point to each number on the hundreds chart.
  • Assign each student 3-4 numbers (e.g., 1-4, 5-9, etc.) and provide them with colorful cardstock to write each number. Have them draw a picture to represent each number. Then, have them come up to a predesigned bulletin board and staple their beautiful visuals up to create a classroom hundreds chart to refer to throughout the year! TipProvide students who need extra support with numbers to trace on their cardstock instead.
  • Pass out the Missing Numbers Counting Bee worksheets and have students complete the hundreds chart as a group. Say the numbers aloud and allow students time to fill in their own chart.
  • Ask students to hold up their completeted hundred chart worksheets and instruct them to colour in the squares that help them count to 100 by 10s, then practise counting to 100 by 10s as a group.
  • Explain that this is another, faster way to count to 100.
(15 minutes)
  • Explain that now students will get to make a class hundreds chart!
  • Tell the class they they will each be assigned 3-4 numbers (e.g., 1-4, 5-9, etc.) and will use colorful cardstock to write each number (one number per page).
  • Model how they will draw a picture to represent each number. TipProvide students who need extra support with numbers to trace on their cardstock instead.
(5 minutes)
  • Read aloud the text, counting aloud throughout and relating the sequence to the hundreds chart displayed in the classroom.

Beginning

  • Allow students to count in their home language (L1).
  • Work with students in a teacher-led group, focus on songs or stories that practise counting to 100.

Advanced

  • Pair students with a partner and have them find other patterns on their hundreds chart. Ask, "What other ways can you find to count to 100 using the hundreds chart?"
  • Have students complete the Missing Numbers: At the Pond worksheet.
(5 minutes)
  • As students work, take anecdotal notes to capture student thinking and assess their ability to follow the counting sequence from 1-100.
  • Collect student work to assess if students were able to accurately write and count numbers between 1-100.
(3 minutes)
  • Gather students back together.
  • Have students come up to a predesigned bulletin board & staple their beautiful visuals up to create a classroom hundreds chart to refer to throughout the year!
  • Close by asking students to think about and share out other strategies for counting to 100.

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