February 15, 2019
|
By Kerry McKee

EL Support Lesson

Solving for One and Ten More

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Picture AdditionLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Picture AdditionLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to identify the number that is one more or 10 more than a given number within 100.

Language

Students will be able to describe the steps to identify the number that is one more or 10 more than a given number using visual and partner support.

(5 minutes)
  • Tell students the story problem, "My students are great artists. Last year, my first graders gave me 15 pictures. This year, my first graders have given me 10 more pictures."
  • Ask students to help you figure out how many pictures you have in all.
  • Tell students to turn and talk to a partner about ways to figure out the total number of pictures.
  • Review with students strategies for solving the problem. Show them the number 15 on the number line. Ask students how you can show that you have more pictures. Students should respond that you need to count on.
  • Count 10 hops on the number line to show students that you now have 25 pictures.
  • Tel students that today you will look for patterns in numbers that help make it easier to find the number that is one more or 10 more than another number.
(10 minutes)
  • Have students show you one finger, and then gesture with hands spread wide apart as they repeat, "More!"
  • Have students show you 10 fingers and then gesture with hands spread wide apart as they repeat again, "More!"
  • Write a two-digit number on the board, such as 58, and remind students how to find one more than the number. Display base-ten blocks on a document projector, and add one cube.
  • Model writing the number in a place value chart, with five in the TensColumn and eight in the OnesColumn. Ask students which digit needs to change to find one more. Change the digit in the ones place to a nine.
  • Ask students do describe other strategies to find one more than a number with a partner using the sentence frame, "I could ____To find one more than a number." Possible suggestions include using a hundreds chart, adding one, or using a number line.
  • Repeat with a few more examples. Include example such as "one more than 59" that require regrouping and creating a 10. Point out that when the ones digit is nine, to add one more you make a 10, and the digit in the ones place starts over at zero.
  • Next, ask students how to find 10 more than the number 58. Display base-ten blocks on a document camera and add a tens rod.
  • Again, model writing the number in the place value chart, and ask students which digit needs to change to find 10 more. Students should respond that you need one more 10, so the digit in the tens place should increase by one.
  • Ask students to discuss other strategies for finding 10 more than a number using the sentence frame, "I could ____To find 10 more than a number." Students could count on 10 on the number line, or look for the number below on the hundreds chart.
  • Solve for 10 more than a few more numbers, modeling with base-ten blocks, on the hundreds chart, and using a place value chart.
(5 minutes)
  • Distribute personal whiteboards and markers to students. Ask students which maths symbol is needed in a number sentence to solve for more than a given number.
  • Write "+ 1" on the board, and draw one star to visually represent the quantity one.
  • Write "+ 10" on the board, and count chorally to 10 as you draw ten stars to show the quantity 10 concretely.
  • Call out a number, for example 38, and tell students to write the numeral on their whiteboards. Next ask students, "What number is one more than 38?" Students should write 38 + 1 = 39.
  • Tell students to repeat after you, "One more than 38 is 39."
  • Tell students to erase their whiteboards and write 38 again. This time ask them, "What number is 10 more than 38?" Students should write 38 + 10 = 48.Prompt students to notice patterns. For example, the digit in the tens place increases by one. The digit in the ones place stays the same.
  • Instruct students to repeat after you, "Ten more than 38 is 48."
  • Continue with more examples, randomly telling students to add one or 10 more to given numbers. Allow students to use base-ten blocks to model numbers if needed.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute the One More Ten More worksheet to students.
  • Allow students to work with partners to complete the worksheet. Provide base-ten blocks and Two Digit Place Value mats for students to show thinking.
  • Circulate and notice which strategies students use to find the number one more or 10 more than a given number.

Beginning

  • If students do not yet know number names in English, allow them to tell you the number that is one more or 10 more in their home language (L1).
  • Instruct students to work with a partner who speaks the same L1, or a sympathetic peer with more developed English-language skills.
  • Read the word problems on the worksheet chorally, and assess understanding of the context of the problem before excusing students to solve the problems.

Advanced

  • As students finish the worksheet, instruct them to write their own story problems involving one more and 10 more on the back of the worksheet.
  • Allow students to exchange word problems with classmates to solve. Encourage students to explain their thinking and justify their solutions as they work to solve each other's problems.
(5 minutes)
  • Circulate and asses whether students are able to successfully identify number that are one and 10 more. Prompt students to explain their thinking by asking, "How do you know that the answer is ____?" or "How can you be sure that 57 is 10 more than 47?" Encourage students to include pictures and other visuals in their solutions that show their thinking.
  • Check that students are not counting by ones as they calculate problems involving 10 more. Students that continue to count by ones need more instruction in strategies for mentally finding 10 more than a given number without counting on. Continue to work with base-ten blocks, place value charts and hundreds charts with these students.
  • As students are able to mentally solve for one and 10 more, introduce one and 10 less.
(5 minutes)
  • Choose a few volunteers to share how they solved for one or 10 more with the class.
  • Tell students to give a thumbs up if they used a similar strategy. Allow students to suggest alternate strategies to solve the same problem.
  • Have students reflect on their learning by sharing with a partner ways to find one more and 10 more than a given number.

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