August 28, 2018
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By Mia Perez

EL Support Lesson

Scary Story Elements

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Using Story Elements to Compare and Contrast Fiction TextsLesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Using Story Elements to Compare and Contrast Fiction TextsLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to compare and contrast story elements between two stories with conjunctions using a word bank and sentence frames.

Language

Students will be able to compare and contrast the story elements between two fictional texts.

(2 minutes)
  • Show students two of the picture cards from the Scary Story Cards worksheet, such as the ghostly ship and the haunted house.
  • Explain to students that the picture cards show where two different scary stories take place, which is the Setting.
  • Tell students that good readers and observers are able to Compare, or see what is the same, and Contrast, or see what is different, about two stories.
  • Ask students to compare and contrast these two picture cards with the person sitting next to them (e.g., they are both scary, but one takes place on the water and one on land).
  • Invite students to share their ideas with the class.
  • Tell students that today they will be comparing and contrasting two stories.
(10 minutes)
  • Display the vocabulary cards with the words CharacterAnd Setting. Review the definitions for each term and place the cards on the pocket chart.
  • Distribute the picture cards from the Scary Story Cards worksheet and the Scary Story Cards: Characters worksheet to the students. Tell students to sort their picture cards based on whether they depict a CharacterOr the Setting. Model how to complete this sorting activity by showing the students each card and thinking aloud about the picture card and whether is a character or the setting.
  • Display the vocabulary cards for ConflictAnd Resolution. Review the definitions for each term and place them on the pocket chart.
  • Place the picture cards from the Scary Story Cards: Items worksheet under these terms. Tell students that these items are often involved in the conflicts that arise in scary stories (e.g., the witch lost her spell book and couldn't turn the cat back into a girl).
  • Sort students into pairs and ask each student to choose one character card, one setting card, or one item card to describe in a sentence out loud. Model how to complete this activity (e.g., the witch had dark hair, green skin, and a wart on the tip of her nose).
  • Invite some students to share their sentences with the class.
(15 minutes)
  • Display the vocabulary card for ConjunctionAnd tell students this is a word that connects words, sentences, or parts of sentences.
  • Write this sentence on the board: "My setting was in a forest, but Nico's setting was in a carnival." Circle the word "but" and tell students that this is an example of a conjunction used when contrasting two stories.
  • Write this sentence on the board: "My character was a witch. Similarly, Bobbie's character was a witch." Circle the word "similarly" and tell students that this is an example of a conjunction used when comparing two stories.
  • Draw two word banks on the board. Write CompareAt the top of one word bank with the words: "and," "just," "as," "also," and "similarly" written in the bank. Write ContrastAt the top of the second word bank with the words: "but," "however," "whereas," and "while" written in the bank. Tell students they will use these word banks to write sentences comparing and contrasting the scary stories they hear.
  • Write these two sentence frames on the board :
    • "In story 1, ____, ____In story 2 ____."
    • In story 2 ____, ____In story 1 ____.
    • Tell students to use these two sentences frames and their words banks during the activity. Tell students to select conjunctions from the word banks to write on the dashed line.
  • Distribute lined paper.
  • Assign students into groups of three and tell them to do the following:
    • Take turns being a storyteller and a listener. Two students will each tell a short scary story using the picture cards by choosing one character card, one setting card, and one item card to tell their story.
    • Be sure their story has all of the parts of a story including character, setting, conflict and resolution.
    • After listening to the two stories, the one student listener will write two sentences: one comparison sentence and one contrasting sentence using conjunctions from the word banks on the board.
  • Repeat this process until each student has had a chance to be a listener and write their sentences.
  • Circulate and offer support as needed.
  • Encourage students to share their sentences with the whole class at the end of the activity.
(7 minutes)
  • Project the Comparing and Contrasting Scary Stories worksheet onto the board.
  • Read aloud the two stories as students follow along.
  • Distribute the Comparing and Contrasting Scary Stories worksheet and tell students to reread the stories.
  • Instruct students to compare and contrast the parts of the two stories by completing the sentence frames. Remind students to use the conjunctions in the word banks to connect the sentences.
  • Assign students into effective partnerships and have them do the following:
    • Compare their answers
    • Discuss their favorite story and why
    • Discuss the purpose of these stories (inform, entertain, or persuade)
  • Call on volunteers to share some highlights from their discussions with their partners.

Beginning

  • Pre-teach a separate lesson to a small group on conjunctions.
  • Allow students to use bilingual dictionaries and glossaries throughout the lesson to define unfamiliar words.
  • Provide students with access to the scary story texts they read during the Discourse Level Focus in their home language (L1).
  • Strategically pair beginning ELs with Advanced ELs when working on the Comparing and Contrasting Scary Stories worksheet during the Discourse Level Focus.

Advanced

  • Distribute longer texts for students to compare and contrast during the Discourse Level Focus.
  • Have students rephrase the directions and word definitions to their classmates throughout the lesson.
  • Strategically pair advanced ELs with beginning or intermediate ELs and have the Advanced ELs summarize the two scary stories during the Discourse Level Focus.
(3 minutes)
  • Distribute one blank index card to each student to use as an exit ticket.
  • Tell students to use the sentence frames on the board and the conjunctions from the word bank to write one more sentence either comparing or contrasting the two stories they heard from their classmates.
  • Collect students index cards.
(3 minutes)
  • Explain to students that comparing and contrasting two stories is a great way for them to improve their comprehension by highlighting important details from both stories.
  • Tell students that today we used both storytelling cards and scary stories to practise this skill.
  • Ask students to think of other things that they can compare and contrast (e.g., two classmates, two movies, two games).

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