March 2, 2019
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By Jasmine Gibson

EL Support Lesson

Introducing Numbers!

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Introducing the Number Three!Lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Introducing the Number Three!Lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to represent numbers using objects.

Language

Students will be able to identify and match numbers and their quantities using tactile supports.

(2 minutes)
  • Gather the students together for a read-aloud.
  • Introduce the book On the Launch PadUsing the vocabulary cards and defining key words from the book. Display a card and ask students to turn and talk to a partner to share what they see. Have pairs share out and clarify meaning as needed.
(10 minutes)
  • Read the book aloud. As you read, emphasize the number each page focuses on (e.g., page one focuses on stars) and model counting the objects highlighted on each page.
  • Display the numbers 1-10 (using the number cards) on the board and re-read the book from back to front, this time pointing to the corresponding number as you read.
  • Explain that you can count forward or backward by saying, "I can count from 1-12 like I just did, or I can count backwards from 12-1. Counting backwards can be fun, but usually we want to count forward. It is like walking backwards (demonstrate). It's fun, but we wouldn't want to do it every day!"
  • Model how to count objects using one-to-one correspondence (e.g., "How many bears do I have? One, two, three," et cetera).
(3 minutes)
  • Point to the number cards on the board and say, "Today we are going to practise using our cards to help us count. I am going to put my cards in order on the rug (place the cards 1-10 in a line on the rug in view of the whole class) and will match my counters to the cards."
  • Model how to place one counter under each number. Then count from 1-10 and have the class echo-count after you.
  • Repeat this process, this time having the students count chorally with you as a group.
(5 minutes)
  • Explain that now you will put the students in pairs and pass out counters and pre-cut number cards to each pair. They will get to put the cards in order on the rug and practise counting out their objects.
  • Pass out materials and have students work in pairs on the rug (if space allows).

Beginning

  • Preview or review numbers 1-10 using songs or additional stories (e.g. 1,2,3 To the Zoo: A Counting BookBy Eric Carle).
  • Pass out number cards 1-5 for students to put in order and match with counters.
  • Have students practise counting in their home language (L1).

Advanced

  • Challenge students to play a game with the number cards where they pull a card (e.g., 5) and need to count out 5 counters.
  • Create a large bulletin board and have students write number words 1-10 in their home languages and create corresponding visuals through different mediums (gems, shells, painting, et cetera). The header could be something like "Numbers Around the World."
(5 minutes)
  • Assess students at work to check if they are able to accurately match their number cards to the corresponding quantity.
  • Ask guiding questions to check student understanding: "How many is this?" "How do you know? "Can you show me five?"
(5 minutes)
  • Close by reading an additional counting book (such as Fish Eyes: A Book You Can Count OnBy Lois Elhert) and have the students practise counting along with you.

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