June 15, 2018
|
By Beth Lemon

EL Support Lesson

Figurative Language

Download lesson plan
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the “Oh, My Word!” with Amelia BedeliaLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

Which set of standards are you looking for?

This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the “Oh, My Word!” with Amelia BedeliaLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to identify figurative language and create original idioms.

Language

I can use figurative language.

(1 minute)
  • Explain to students that today they will learn how writers make their writing exciting using Figurative language.
  • Define figurative language and write it on the board. Give an example (i.e. "It's raining cats and dogs!")
  • Have students turn to partners to discuss the expression and its intended meaning.
(8 minutes)
  • Provide definitions (on board or projected) of all vocabulary words.
  • Explain that some word play uses idioms and some use metaphors, similes, or homophones.
  • Explain that students will now rotate around the room to the brainstorming sheets and add their comments and/or example sentences for each word and read about what other students have written. (Note: This can be done informally, with students choosing which words to approach and in what order, or more formally, with students divided into groups and rotating systematically from word to word.)
  • Separate students into groups with a completed brainstorming sheet and have them answer questions aloud about the word. For instance: "What does the word mean?"
  • Have students use sentence frames for support in their oral discussion.
  • Allow students to create and share aloud their own sentences with the new vocabulary words. For example: "____Is a homophone of ____."
(8 minutes)
  • Distribute the Easy as Pie worksheet.
  • Read the directions to the students, and ask a volunteer to repeat the instructions back to you.
  • Ask for the whole class' attention, then think aloud to model analyzing the first sentence. Ask the following questions and have students explain the clues:
    • Which word fits best here?
    • How do we know?
  • Have students work independently or in pairs to complete the rest of the worksheet.
(8 minutes)
  • Distribute the Metaphors in Context worksheet, read the directions to the students, and ask a volunteer to repeat the instructions back to you.
  • Read the first passage aloud. Have students circle new vocabulary as they read along with you.
  • Give students a few minutes to reread the passage in pairs before analyzing the first question.
  • Ask for whole class' attention, then think aloud analyzing the passage. Ask the following questions and have students explain the clues:
    • Which two things are being compared here?
    • How do we know?
  • Have students work in pairs to read the second passage and complete the rest of the worksheet.
(5 minutes)
  • Assess students' understanding of vocabulary by evaluating their accuracy with partner talk, worksheets, and participation throughout the lesson.
(2 minutes)
  • Distribute index cards/sticky notes as exit tickets.
  • Instruct students to write their names on the back and choose one of 2–3 sentences to complete on their exit tickets. Write the sentence frames on the board. Example: "A simile compares ____Using ____."

Add to collection

Create new collection

Create new collection

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely

What could we do to improve Education.com?

Please note: Use the Contact Us link at the bottom of our website for account-specific questions or issues.

What would make you love Education.com?

What is your favorite part about Education.com?