September 18, 2018
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By Mia Perez

EL Support Lesson

Explaining Illustrations with Declarative Sentences

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: Connecting Text and IllustrationsLesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: Connecting Text and IllustrationsLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to explain what is happening in a story illustration with declarative sentences using a graphic organizer.

Language

Students will be able to compare and contrast the text of a story with a visual presentation of a text.

(3 minutes)
  • Flip through the pages of a picture book.
  • Call on students to share what they like about reading picture books versus chapter books or books without illustrations.
  • Tell students that the illustrations play a very important role in both our enjoyment of a book but also in our ability to understand a book.
  • Explain to students that today they will look at illustrations from different picture books and answer questions about the information they communicate about the story and characters.
(7 minutes)
  • Tell students that as they look at picture books they may encounter some words that they are unfamiliar with.
  • Distribute a copy of the Glossary to each student.
  • Show the vocabulary cards for Encounter, Pleasant, Troublesome, and VarietyOn the document camera. Read each word and the student-friendly definition aloud. If applicable, describe the image.
  • Instruct students to write "Example/Synonym" in the last column of the Glossary sheet. Show a teacher copy on the document camera and model how to come up with a synonym for the word "encounter" (e.g., meet).
  • Tell students to complete the last column of the Glossary for the remaining vocabulary words.
  • Provide students with thesauri or online dictionaries to use as resources to look up examples and synonyms for the vocabulary words.
  • Call on students to share their work on the document camera.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute whiteboards to each student.
  • Tell students that they will be looking at illustrations from books and explaining what is happening in them using Declarative sentences. Show students the vocabulary card, read the definition aloud, and provide an example of a declarative sentence. Emphasize that these sentences declare (or state) something, end in a period, and are used when we are explaining information.
  • Show the Jack and the Beanstalk Story worksheet on the document camera with the text covered and tell students this is an illustration from "Jack and the Beanstalk."
  • Ask students: "What is happening in this picture?" Tell students to turn to their neighbour to share what they think is happening. Then, instruct students to write a declarative sentence on their whiteboard about what is happening (e.g., Jack is cutting the beanstalk). Instruct students to hold up their whiteboards so you can read their sentences.
  • Ask students: "What do you see that makes you say that?" Tell students to turn to their neighbour to share what they see that makes them say that. Then, instruct students to write a declarative sentence on their whiteboard about what they see that makes them say that (e.g., Jack is holding an ax and the beanstalk looks like it is about to fall down). Instruct students to hold up their whiteboards so you can read their sentences.
  • Uncover the text and read it aloud. Ask students: "What words or phrases in the text help you understand the illustration?" Tell students to turn to their neighbors to share words or phrases. Call on volunteers to share with the whole class.
  • Ask students: "What extra details in the illustrations do you see that are not in the text?" Tell students to turn to their neighbors to share ideas before sharing with the whole class.
(15 minutes)
  • Distribute the Analyzing Story Illustrations worksheet to each student and display a teacher copy on the document camera.
  • Assign students into partnerships and tell students that they will first look at an illustration from the story Gulliver's TravelsAnd answer questions 1–2. Remind students not to read the text and to write using declarative sentences.
  • Circulate to offer support.
  • Draw students' attention to the text associated with the illustration and read it aloud to students. Define any unfamiliar words and ask students to reread the text before answering questions 3–4. Remind students to write using declarative sentences.
  • Group two partnerships into groups of four students to compare their answers.
  • Regroup as a whole class and call on students to share their work.

Beginning

  • Pre-teach a lesson to a small group on declarative sentences.
  • Assign students into effective partnerships for the Sentence Level Focus.
  • Write sentence frames on the board for students to use during the Sentence Level Focus (e.g., "I think Jack is ____").
  • Provide bilingual resources such as online dictionaries and glossaries for students to use if they encounter unfamiliar words during the Discourse Level Focus.

Advanced

  • Challenge students to use each of their new vocabulary words in a sentence as they are filling in their glossaries during the Word Level Focus.
  • Ask students to think about other types of sentences (e.g., exclamatory or interrogative) and to think of examples of each type of sentence during the Sentence Level Focus.
  • Challenge students to think about what types of details they would add to the illustration and/or details they would add to the text from Gulliver's TravelsAnd explain why during the Discourse Level Focus.
(3 minutes)
  • Distribute a blank index card to each student to use as an exit ticket.
  • Show students an illustration from a picture book they are familiar with on the document camera.
  • Tell students to write one declarative sentence that says what they think is happening in the illustration.
  • Collect students' exit tickets.
(2 minutes)
  • Tell students that during today's activity they practiced looking at illustrations and explaining the connection between the text and illustrations in picture books.
  • Explain to students that this can help them deepen their understanding of a text and build their comprehension skills.
  • Remind students that the illustrations in picture books are just as important as the words because they can communicate things that cannot be as easily communicated through words.

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