February 24, 2019
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By April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Comparing Even and Odd Groups

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Odd One OutLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Odd One OutLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to determine whether a group of objects has an even or odd number of items.

Language

Students will discuss whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an even or odd number of items with grade-level academic vocabulary using discussions and manipulatives for support.

(5 minutes)
  • Gather students to sit on the floor in front of the whiteboard. Project the What Do You Notice? worksheet and say, "There are four groups of circles. What do you notice about these groups? I want you to turn and talk to a partner, using the sentence frame on the board for support." Write the following sentence frame on the board and model completing it with something you notice about the groups of circles:
    • I notice ____.
  • Allow a few students to share their answers with the rest of the class. Next ask students, "What do you notice about the red group compared to the blue groups?" Have students turn and talk to a partner, sharing their ideas. Allow a few students to share their answers with the class.
  • Continue asking prompting questions: "Are any of these groups the same? Which groups? Why? Are any of the groups different? Why?" Allow students to share a few of their ideas with the class and provide positive reinforcement on their deep thinking skills.
(7 minutes)
  • Circle the red group of circles. Explain to the students that the red group has an OddNumber of circles. Explain to the students that when a number is odd, it means that the number cannot be Divided, or separated, into pairs without having leftovers.
  • Circle the pair of red circles and explain to the students that one of the red circles does not have a pair. Ask students to do a think-pair-share, explaining what odd means to an elbow partner.
  • Draw students' attention to the groups of blue circles. Explain to the students that the blue groups of circles have EvenNumbers. Explain to the students that when a number is even, it means that number can be divided into pairs without any leftovers.
  • Circle each pair of blue circles and reinforce that each group of blue circles can be divided into pairs without having leftovers. Have students do a think-pair-share, explaining what even means to their other elbow partner.
  • Write the following sentence frames on the board:
    • If something is odd, it means it ____Be divided into pairs without leftovers.
    • If something is even, it means it ____Be divided into pairs without leftovers.
  • Provide students with a word bank with the words: cannot, can.
  • Place a visual (like a checkmark) next to the word "can" and a visual (like an X) next to "cannot" to increase student understanding. Alternatively, use red and green, or other images that will support students in understanding the meaning of the words.
  • Ask students to stand up and find a partner they have not spoken with yet during the lesson. Read the sentence frames aloud and the words in the word bank. Have students take turns completing the sentences frames using the words from the word bank.
  • Rotate around the classroom and listen to students as they share out.
(10 minutes)
  • Get out 20 manipulatives (e.g. shells, rocks, gems, cubes, blocks, etc.) and ask for a student volunteer. Ask the student to come up with a number between 10–20. Write the number down on the whiteboard. Ask the student to count out the same number of manipulatives as their chosen number.
  • Explain to the student that next they must figure out if their chosen number is even or odd. Ask students, "How can we figure out if this number of ____(rocks/stones/shells) is even or odd? What should we do?" Allow a few students to share their ideas.
  • Allow the student volunteer to choose a strategy to use, based on their thinking or their peers' ideas. Encourage the student to explain their thinking by asking prompting questions like:
    • Can you tell me why you ____(insert strategy)?
    • What if we ____Instead? Could we divide these objects between us? How would that support us in figuring out if the number of objects is even or odd?
  • Continue to support the student until they're able to use a strategy that shows whether or not the number of objects is even or odd. Write the following sentence frame on the board and ask the student to share their answer:
    • This number is ____(odd/even) because ____.
  • Put students into partnerships and pass out whiteboards, manipulatives, and whiteboard markers to each pair.
  • Ask another student to come up with a number between 10–20, choosing a different number from the previous number.
  • Give students a few minutes to figure out if the number is even or odd, using a strategy that was modeled or a strategy of their choice.
  • Allow a group to briefly share their answer and thinking with the class, using the sentence frame for support.
(10 minutes)
  • Put the students into groups of four and pass out a copy of the Ocean maths Adventure game to each group of students.
  • Explain the directions of the game to the students and allow them access to the manipulatives and whiteboards/markers to support their sense-making strategies.
  • Remind students to be compassionate and kind (and what that looks, sounds, feels like) when they discuss whether their classmate's answer is correct or incorrect. Provide the following sentence stems on the board for students to use during their discussions:
    • The number ____Is even because ____.
    • The number ____Is odd because ____.
  • Give students sufficient time to play the game so they each have a turn.

Beginning

  • Have students write down sentence stems/frames in their maths journals that can be used throughout the lesson with visuals to support understanding prior to the lesson (e.g. "I notice ____." For this sentence stem, draw a picture of a child with a lightbulb over their head to show that the student is thinking/noticing something).
  • Practise reading sentence stems/frames prior to the lesson to support students.
  • Provide vocabulary cards with the words Odd, Even, and DividePrior to the lesson. Have the student draw their own illustrations or find photographs to connect with each word.
  • Provide students with vocabulary cards in English and student's home language (L1) if possible.
  • Encourage students to refer to sentence stems/frames during group work.

Advanced

  • Encourage students to share their ideas with the class, without relying on the sentence stems/frames.
  • Ask students to share the strategy they would use with the class during guided practise.
  • Have students who have mastered the language in the lesson and are ready for a challenge roll the dice twice and add the numbers together. Next, they can figure out whether or not the sum of the two numbers is even or odd.
  • Rotate around the room and jot down notes, visuals, and strategies you notice students using to figure out whether or not the numbers on the dice are even or odd. Record discussions and ways students justify whether the number is even/odd.
  • Write down speaking and listening goals that need to be taught in depth, such as: following respectful rules for discussions, linking comments to remarks of others, and asking for clarification as needed. Use observations as a formative assessment to plan future lessons on exploring even and odd numbers.
(3 minutes)
  • Gather students back together and discuss some of the visuals, strategies, and collaborative conversation skills you noticed while observing the students.
  • Say, "We really gave our brains a workout today! Turn and talk to your partner, explaining something you learned today about odd and even numbers."

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