February 25, 2019
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By April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Compare and Contrast Clocks

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Time to Tell Time: Showing and Writing TimeLesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Time to Tell Time: Showing and Writing TimeLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to tell time using analog and digital clocks.

Language

Students will be able to compare and contrast characteristics of analog and digital clocks with more complex sentences using sentence frames and peer discussions for support.

(4 minutes)
  • Make sure all clocks in the classroom are covered.
  • Explain to the students that today they will be exploring different types of clocks that tell time. Say, "I want you to close your eyes and think about the different types of clocks you've seen. Think about the size, shape, numbers, and parts of the clock. When you have an image in your mind, turn and talk to an elbow partner and try to describe what the clock looks like."
  • Provide sentence frames for students to use when sharing out, such as:
    • The clock I'm thinking about is ____(size, shape, etc.) and you tell time using ____(hands, numbers, etc.).
  • Allow a few students to share out their ideas and record them on the whiteboard for students to refer to throughout the lesson. Students may describe a parent's watch, iPod, iPad, computer clock, or other versions of digital clocks. Get out the Analog clockAnd Digital clockAnd display them where all students can see.
  • Explain to the students that today they will be comparing and contrasting analog and digital clocks.
(8 minutes)
  • Uncover the clocks in the room and tell your students about something you have to do today that involves telling time. An example would be, "I have been waiting a long time to get my haircut. I have an appointment to get my haircut today at 4:30. I know that at school, we have an analog clock on the wall, and on my computer I have a digital clock. I want to make sure that I'm on time for my appointment, so I need to know how to read both types of clocks."
  • Tell students that you want to make sure you understand how to tell time using both the analog clock and the digital clocks, because at school there is an analog clock and in your car you have a digital clock.
  • Hold up the analog clock. Ask students to turn and talk to a partner, explaining what they know about reading time using an analog clock. Allow a few partnerships to share out their ideas.
  • Draw an example analog clock on the whiteboard and label its parts (ie. hour hand and minute hand).
  • Write the process of using an analog clock to tell time on the whiteboard. Write the following steps:
    1. Look at the hour hand. The hour hand is the short hand.
    2. Look at the minute hand. The minute hand is the long hand. If the minute hand is on the 12, no minutes have passed and it is exactly ____O'clock (4 o'clock, 5 o'clock, etc).
    3. Write down the time using a ColonTo separate the hour from the minutes: ____: ____. If no minutes have passed, we write 00 in the minutes because no minutes have passed.
  • Ask students to think about how to show the time 4:30 on the analog clock.
  • Model how to move the hour hand to the four, and skip count by fives to the six, which shows 30 minutes past four o'clock.
  • Write down the following sentence frame on the board:
    • The clock shows ____Minutes after ____. The time is ____.
  • Say, "The clock shows 30 minutes after 4. The time is 4:30."
  • Display or project the digital clock for students to see. Ask students to turn and talk to a partner, explaining what they know about reading time using a digital clock. Allow a few partnerships to share out their ideas.
  • Draw an example digital clock on the whiteboard and label its parts (ie. the hour, colon, and minute). Show students what 4:30 looks like on the digital clock.
  • Repeat the process with 5:00. Encourage students to help figure out how to show the time on the analog clock and digital clock.
(10 minutes)
  • Put students in A/B partnerships and explain that today they will be comparing and contrasting analog clocks with digital clocks. Explain to the students that when you compare, you think about how things are the same. When you contrast, you think about how things are different.
  • Pass out whiteboard markers and whiteboards to each partnership. On the whiteboard, write the following times in words: five o'clock, six thirty, eight o'clock, nine fifteen, ten o'clock (choose times that are to the nearest five minutes, half hour, or hour). Read the times aloud and have students repeat them back to you.
  • Give each partnership an analog clock. Explain to the students that Partner A will create the time on their analog clock. Next, Partner B will write down what the digital time would look like using their whiteboard. Provide the example template on the board and have students copy it down on their whiteboards:
    • ____: ____
  • Instruct students to continue this process until they have created each time on their analog clock and written the example digital clock time on the whiteboard.
  • Write the following sentence frame on the board to support students in discussing the time shown on their clocks:
    • The clock shows ____Minutes after ____. The time is ____.
  • Have partners use the the following sentence frames to compare and contrast the types of clocks:
    • The clocks are similar because ____.
    • The clocks are different because ____.
    • One clock ____, but the other clock ____.
  • After working together with a partner to compare and contrast the clocks, have each pair of students get together with another pair to share what they learned. Have them use the following sentence frames to guide their discussion:
    • What our group noticed is that both clocks ____.
    • What are group noticed is that one clock ____.
  • Support students to answer the questions by reminding them of the sentence frames they can use.
(8 minutes)
  • Tell students that they are going to use what they have learned about telling time using analog clocks and digital clocks to complete a worksheet that asks them to match times on analog clocks to times on digital clocks.
  • Pass out the Telling Time: Morning Activities worksheet to each partnership.
  • Refer to the first problem and have students turn to a partner and share how they might solve the problem.
  • Instruct students to solve the problems on the worksheet independently and then share their answers with their partner.
  • Encourage students to refer to the steps on the whiteboard that detail how to figure out the time shown on an analog clock.

Beginning

  • Provide a visual of a haircut and salon so students have context for the story problem introduced in the introduction.
  • Give students a word bank that includes important words/phrases from the lesson and includes descriptive words that will help them describe each clock.
  • Allow students to work in a small, teacher-led group or partner them with a student who speaks the same home language (L1), if possible.
  • Allow students to explain their answers in their home language (L1), if possible.

Advanced

  • Encourage students to share their ideas without referring to the sentence stems/frames for support.
  • Ask students to explain the process for reading time using an analog clock in their own words.
  • Rotate around the classroom and ask students to share how they completed their worksheets.
  • Use prompting questions to gain an understanding of the steps students took to read the time on the analog clock and match the corresponding time on the digital clock.
  • Provide students with opportunities to correct their work by asking them questions, such as:
    • Is there something you still need extra help with?
    • What steps are you unclear about? How could your partner help you?
    • Did you and your partner get the same answer? Why might you have different answers?
(3 minutes)
  • Ask students to answer one of the discussion questions. Write down their ideas on the whiteboard.
    • Which clock is easier to tell time from? Why?
    • What is something you're still wondering about?
    • How are the clocks the same? How are they different?
    • What step is the most difficult for you when reading analog clocks? Why?
    • Which clock do you prefer to use? Why?

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