August 28, 2018
|
By Mia Perez

Lesson plan

A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: Connecting Text and Illustrations

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Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Explaining Illustrations with Declarative SentencesPre-lesson.
EL Adjustments
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Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Explaining Illustrations with Declarative SentencesPre-lesson.

Students will be able to compare and contrast the text of a story with a visual presentation of a text.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(5 minutes)
  • Show students the illustration on the cover of a book with the text covered, like Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, and ask students to use the illustration to predict what the book might be about.
  • Show students the title of the book with the illustration covered and ask students to use the title of the book to predict what the book might be about.
  • Show students the book cover with both the title and the illustration visible and ask students to use both the title and the illustration to predict what the book might be about.
  • Ask students to reflect on this experience. Ask the following questions:
    • Was it easier to make predictions about the book using the text or the illustration?
    • How did your predictions change when you looked at the text and the illustrations together?
  • Explain that this activity helps us understand how the text and illustrations work together to help us understand more about what we are reading.
  • Tell students that today they will practise making connections between the text of a story and the illustrations.
(10 minutes)
  • Post a piece of chart paper on the board and draw a Venn diagram with the headings "Written Text" and "Illustrations."
  • Tell students they are going to compare and contrast the text of a story with the illustrations from a story.
  • Refer to the "Written Text" heading and ask students to brainstorm what type of information they can get from the words of a story (e.g., the names of characters).
  • Write students' ideas under "Written Text."
  • Refer to the "Illustrations" heading and ask students to brainstorm what type of information they can get from the pictures in a story (e.g., the way a character looks).
  • Write students' ideas under "Illustrations."
  • Ask students to identify any information that is the same for both headings and move this information to the centre of the diagram.
  • Instruct students to analyze the diagram and discuss their findings.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students that now they are going to practise comparing and contrasting the text with the illustrations using the pages from a picture book.
  • Write the following guiding questions on the board for students to use throughout the discussion:
    • What details from the text are represented in the picture? (Optional: highlight in the text the details that are represented in the picture.)
    • Are there details in the illustration that are not mentioned in the text?
    • How does looking at both the pictures and the text deepen your understanding?
  • Project a page from a picture book onto the board with the text covered. (Tip: select a picture book with detailed illustrations such as Chris Van Allsburg's JumanjiOr The Polar Express).
  • Tell students to look closely at the picture and to pay close attention to the details and ask students to reflect upon their observations. Ask the following questions:
    • What is happening in this picture?
    • What do you see that makes you say that?
  • Uncover the text that goes with the picture and read it aloud.
  • Have students find a partner and think-pair-share using the guiding questions written on the board.
  • Project a page from the same picture book onto the board with the picture covered.
  • Read aloud the text and have students discuss what is happening.
  • Uncover the picture that goes with the text.
  • Have students find a partner and think-pair-share using the guiding questions written on the board.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students that now they will practise this skill independently.
  • Distribute one picture book to each student, along with lined paper or their writing journals.
  • Instruct students to first "read" their picture books by looking only at the pictures. Then, have them read the picture book a second time by reading the written text.
  • Ask students to respond in writing to the following prompts:
    • "What is the same about how the story is presented visually and in writing?"
    • "How is it different?"
    • "How does looking at both the pictures and the text deepen your understanding?"
  • Circulate and offer support as needed.

Support:

  • Distribute the Venn Diagram worksheet to assist students in organizing their ideas during Independent Work Time.
  • Strategically form partnerships during Independent Work Time so that struggling readers are paired with fluent readers.
  • Create sentence frames for students to use during Independent Work Time. These frames can include the following: "The illustrations and text are the same because ____" and "The illustrations and text are different because _____."

Enrichment:

  • Ask students to think about the role of the illustrator of a picture book. Explain that sometimes the illustrator is different than the author. For the writing activity during Independent Work Time, ask students to think about how having a different illustrator and author would be different from having an author who is also the illustrator. How could this impact the reader? Would it make the connection between the story and the illustration stronger or weaker—or have no impact?
  • Ask students to brainstorm ways that a story can be presented other than through illustrations (i.e., dramas, plays, etc.). Ask students to compare and contrast the text of a story with a second presentation during Independent Work Time.
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students they are going to participate in a self-assessment exercise. Prompt them with several statements and have them give a thumbs-up if they agree with the statement or a thumbs-down if they disagree with the statement.
    • "I can compare and contrast the text with an image that represents the text."
    • "I can explain how the image connects the message of the text."
    • "I can identify parts of a text that are represented in an image."
    • "I can explain how connecting the text with an image deepens my understanding of the text."
  • Note student responses to gauge understanding.
(5 minutes)
  • Review with students that today they compared and contrasted the text of a story with a visual presentation of the story in the form of illustrations.
  • Explain to students that in addition to visual presentations of texts there are the oral presentations of texts such as plays.
  • Ask students to begin to think about the similarities and differences between the text of stories and plays.
  • Close the activity by explaining that students who are able to make connections between different presentations—visual and oral—of a story will gain a greater understanding of the story as a whole because different presentations can impact the reader's perception along with increasing the amount of details and visual imagery the reader experiences.

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